About Us

 

Samuele Nannoni

I was born in 1993 in Florence, where I am currently living. I graduated with honors in International and Diplomatic Science in 2017 at the University of Bologna. At the moment I am doing an internship in the event division of an enterprise which deals with renewables energies. I am interested in national and international politics, as well as in studies on democracy and institutional architectures. Since 2019 I'm editor in chief for the online journal TomorrowTurin.

 

Marco Sciolis - IT & Web Master

I was born in 1991 in Florence, where I am currently living. I graduated with honors in Psychology in 2016 at the University of Florence. I’m fond of informatics and new technologies, and I’ve been following italian politics and democracy life of Italy for a long time.

 

Supporters

 

Alessandro Pluchino

Alessandro Pluchino is associate professor of theoretical physics at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, and research associate at INFN, Sezione di Catania.

His research interests mainly concern the elaboration of mathematical and computational models of complex systems, ranging from fundamental physics to biological systems, up to applications to social and economic systems. Author of many scientific publications on international journals, he also published popular books for non-specialist readers. In this respect, among his more recent publications, we find ”La firma della complessità. Una passeggiata al margine del caos” (2015), “Pillole di complessità” (2016) and "Il vuoto. Un enigma tra fisica e metafisica” (with Maurizio Consoli, 2015).

In 2010 he was awarded, with Andrea Rapisarda and Cesare Garofalo, of the Ig-Nobel prize for Management at the Harvard University (more information can be found in the popular book “Abbiamo vinto l’Ig-Nobel con il principio di Peter. Scienza, caso e humor”, Malcor D’Edizione 2017).

Recently, his research activity focused on the beneficial role of randomness in socio-economic systems. In particular, in political context, together with Andrea Rapisarda, Cesare Garofalo, Maurizio Caserta and Salvatore Spagano, he developed a model of virtual parliament in order to show that it will be more efficient if a certain percentage of deputies, instead to be elected, would be selected at random and would remain independent from parties. In this respect, we can mention the popular book “Democrazia a sorte. La sorte della democrazia” (Malcor D’Edizione 2012). See the dedicated web site.

Further information are available on the personal web site.

 

Andrea Rapisarda

Andrea Rapisarda is associate professor of theoretical physics, mathematical methods and models at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania and he is in charge of research at The National Institute of Nuclear Physics. He is also an external member of Complexity Science Hub in Vienna and since 2016 is coordinator of the PhD in complex systems for the physical, socio-economic and life sciences at the University of Catania. From 2013 to 2016 he was delegate of the Rector to internationalization and responsible for the Erasmus project for the University of Catania. He was also president of the degree course in physics at the University of Catania from 2004 to 2010. He is currently part of the editorial board of various international journals including Physica A, "Cogent Physics", "Heliyon", Frontiers in Physics | Social Physics. He is a member of Italian Society of Physics and Complex Systems Society. Since December 2018 he's co-director of the School on Complexity of Ettore Majorana Foundation of Erice.

His research interests range from theoretical physics, to statistical mechanics, to complex systems with applications to geological, social, economic and financial systems. On these issues he co-authored more than 150 scientific publications in international journals and organized several international schools and conferences. He is also actively involved in scientific dissemination and has intervened several times in radio and television broadcasts both in Italy and abroad.

In 2010 he was awarded, with Alessandro Pluchino and Cesare Garofalo, of the IgNobel Prize for Management at Harvard University (more information can be found in the popular book “Abbiamo vinto l’Ig-Nobel con il principio di Peter. Scienza, caso e humor”, Malcor D’Edizione 2017”.

Recently, his research has focused on the beneficial role of the case in socio-economic systems. In particular, in the political sphere, together with Alessandro Pluchino, Cesare Garofalo, Maurizio Caserta and Salvatore Spagano, he elaborated a model of virtual Parliament with which it was shown how the Parliament would be more efficient if a certain percentage of Members, rather than being elected, would be selected at random and would remain independent from parties. In this respect, we can mention the popular book “Democrazia a sorte. La sorte della democrazia” (Malcor D’Edizione 2012). See the dedicated web site:

More information can be found on the personal web site.

 

Dimitri Courant

Dimitri Courant is PhD candidate in political science at the University of Lausanne and the University Paris-VIII, under the direction of Yves Sintomer and Jean-Philippe Leresche. His research focuses on sortition, democracy, deliberation and representation. His sociological analysis of political uses of random selection in the XXth and XXIst century covers various areas and countries: pro-sortition activism; evolution of lottery equipment both material and digital; qualitative comparative studies of empirical cases of randomly selected deliberative assemblies in France, Ireland, and Switzerland. He has recently co-directed a special issue of the review Participations (2019) and published in the reviews Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía (2017), La Vie des Idées (2019), AOC (2019), and in the collective books Expériences du tirage au sort en Suisse et en Europe: un état des lieux (2018), Sortition and Democracy (2019) and Legislature by Lot (2019).

More information can be found on the personal website